July 22, 2014   399 notes

fyspringfield:

The Simpsons - Kitchen Sink by FXX

July 21, 2014   377 notes

khealywu:

thisismyfavoritesong:

uncannybrettwhite:

sebsational:

How I almost signed over my entire life to Applebee’s for a gift card of an indeterminate amount.

Also their last tweet. Who do they think I am? I went to COLLEGE.

This is NUTS. 

What kind of scam is Applebee’s running, y’all?! There’s something rotten in the usually otherwise delicious Brew Pub Pretzels & Beer Cheese Dip.

What I’ve been up to today.

This is just incredible.

July 21, 2014   5,574 notes

(Source: fyspringfield.com, via fyspringfield)

July 21, 2014   5 notes

930club:

KEEP YER EYES PEELED: Run River North

The first couple things you’ll learn about Run River North from just about every article written about them go as follows:

  1. They used to be called Monsters Coming Home.
  2. They are a “Korean folk-pop/folk-rock” band. Really, this just means that they’re all Korean-American, and they’re in a folk-rock band.
  3. They have the same producer as Fleet Foxes, The Shins, and Band of Horses. His name is Phil.
  4. Honda secretly booked them on Jimmy Kimmel Live when they discovered that River Run North had filmed their first music video entirely in the backseats of their cars. 
  5. You can watch the band find out in an adorably heart-warming video/commercial. I highly recommend it. 

So, now that’s out of the way, let’s get to business: how’s the music? Well, if you’ve been looking for a new folk-pop/rock fix while Of Monsters and Men and Mumford and Sons are off doing whatever it is that they are doing, then look no further. Their debut album Run River North was released in February and, trust me, it will scratch your folk-pop itch. It’s got everything: raging acoustic guitars, beautiful harmonies, and, most importantly, those oh-so singalong-able choruses we’ve all come to know and love.

They’ll be touring the east coast this fall, opening for the also fantastic Boy & Bear, so keep yer eyes peeled. 

-Dylan Singleton 

July 21, 2014   10 notes

howtosharpenpencils:

GOING DEEP discussion topic: “WHAT IS A HOLE?”

Please review this seminar/argument about the ontology of holes before watching tonight’s episode of GOING DEEP WITH DAVID REES, entitled “HOW TO DIG A HOLE” (immediately followed by “HOW TO FLIP A COIN”).

Yes, our show has homework assignments! Summer school is in session.

(The show is on NatGeo at 10PM EST.)

July 21, 2014
July 17, 2014   135 notes
hallekiefer:

unforgettabledetritus:


A few years ago, after reading in a book that people who feel a strong sense of community have been proven to lead longer and happier lives, Bamford started working to overcome her natural shyness and fear of interaction by saying hello to her neighbors in Eagle Rock, a diverse and partly gentrified area on the northeastern edge of Los Angeles. She bought a park bench and had it installed on the median strip in front of her house. She then spray-stenciled the words “Have a Seat!” on the sidewalk in front of it. To her delight, the bench is often occupied. “It’s like a bird feeder for humans,” she says.

—The Weird, Scary, and Ingenious Brain of Maria Bamford

I love her and I love this!

hallekiefer:

unforgettabledetritus:

A few years ago, after reading in a book that people who feel a strong sense of community have been proven to lead longer and happier lives, Bamford started working to overcome her natural shyness and fear of interaction by saying hello to her neighbors in Eagle Rock, a diverse and partly gentrified area on the northeastern edge of Los Angeles. She bought a park bench and had it installed on the median strip in front of her house. She then spray-stenciled the words “Have a Seat!” on the sidewalk in front of it. To her delight, the bench is often occupied. “It’s like a bird feeder for humans,” she says.

The Weird, Scary, and Ingenious Brain of Maria Bamford

I love her and I love this!

July 17, 2014   56 notes

ratliff2016gold:

NEWLY DISCOVERED ACTUAL FOOTAGE OF 9-YEAR OLD CONNOR RATLIFF COMPETING IN THE “LITTLE OLYMPICS.”

July 15, 2014   45 notes

As my belly grew, the comments got even stranger. I had secretly hoped for no reaction, for our choice to be as common as saying, ‘I went with the mustard instead of the ketchup.’ No reaction would mean something good, right? That women in this country are, for example, no longer considered the property of men, even in name. That archaic systems are truly collapsing. That we can reclaim language that was formerly used to control us.

But it seemed, at least to me, that using a woman’s last name for a child threatened everyone. An older woman asked me if I was doing this to make a point. Why was all this doing perceived as mine, not my husband’s as well? At a party, a peer told me she was ‘diehard Obama’ and then argued that her only real concern about using a woman’s last name is that you risk the ease of preserving lineage and historical records.

'Really?' I kept responding.

I always tried to be kind. But my outrage began to blossom.

What Happened When We Gave Our Daughter My Last Name, by Molly Caro May (via katiecoyle)

July 8, 2014   4 notes